Monday, January 23, 2006

No to Nuclear

BBC Website is running a poll, "Should we expand nuclear energy?". Clearly the nuclear lobby knew about it first, with over 70% votes so far saying yes, but the proportion is declining as more Greens and ordinary citizens get clicking.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4638610.stm

4 comments:

shusurvey12 said...

Please participate in a new energy issues survey--UNIDO-ICHET survey


Dear All:
We are currently launching a poll sponsored by UNIDO-ICHET to study public opinions and attitudes towards hydrogen energy related issues. We are also looking for feedback related to UNIDO-ICHET's website. Would you please logon to one of the URLs listed below (you can logon either site we offer). Your answers will produce valuable information for our researchers.
http://www.unido-ichet.org
http://www.ichet.org (UNIDO-ICHET homepage, please log on and click 'for UNIDO-ICHET survey' button)
http://eshop.ereach.com.tw/UNIDO-ICHETsurvey (questionnaire web pages)

And please forward this meaningful survey message to anyone whom you know is also suitable to answer this questionnaire. Thank you.

Sponsorship: UNIDO-ICHET (UNITED NATIONS INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION - INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR HYDROGEN ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES)
Project leader: Mavis Tsai, Ph. D. Shih Hsin University

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Anonymous said...

Whether tragic events touch your family personally or are brought into your home via newspapers and television, you can help children cope with the anxiety that violence, death, and disasters can cause.

Listening and talking to children about their concerns can reassure them that they will be safe. Start by encouraging them to discuss how they have been affected by what is happening around them. Even young children may have specific questions about tragedies. Children react to stress at their own developmental level.

The Caring for Every Child's Mental Health Campaign offers these pointers for parents and other caregivers:

* Encourage children to ask questions. Listen to what they say. Provide comfort and assurance that address their specific fears. It's okay to admit you can't answer all of their questions.
* Talk on their level. Communicate with your children in a way they can understand. Don't get too technical or complicated.
* Find out what frightens them. Encourage your children to talk about fears they may have. They may worry that someone will harm them at school or that someone will try to hurt you.
* Focus on the positive. Reinforce the fact that most people are kind and caring. Remind your child of the heroic actions taken by ordinary people to help victims of tragedy.
* Pay attention. Your children's play and drawings may give you a glimpse into their questions or concerns. Ask them to tell you what is going on in the game or the picture. It's an opportunity to clarify any misconceptions, answer questions, and give reassurance.
* Develop a plan. Establish a family emergency plan for the future, such as a meeting place where everyone should gather if something unexpected happens in your family or neighborhood. It can help you and your children feel safer.

If you are concerned about your child's reaction to stress or trauma, call your physician or a community mental health center.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for all the useful facts; they were easy to understand for me. Keep up the great work!!!
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